Save Bees

At Pure we work hard to celebrate the interdependence between people and nature. One way we do this is by bringing awareness and raising money for causes that are important to us. One of those causes is saving bee populations. That is why we have created the Save Bees Collection to help raise awareness and money bee conservation. 

Imagine a grey world without almonds, apples, or fragrant flowers…

Sounds terrible, right?

Unfortunately, that’s the shocking future we face if we don’t work to help our most precious pollinator: bees. Bees lie at the heart of our survival – and they have been dying at unprecedented rates. Their hard work is not only essential to healthy ecosystems, but to sustaining animal and human life too.

Each year, bees are experiencing massive die-offs throughout the U.S. and Canada. In 2017, the rusty patched bumblebee was the first bee added to the endangered species list in the continental U.S. A 2019 survey from the Bee Informed Partnership states that nearly 40% of U.S. beekeepers lost their colonies during the previous year. Compared to 1947, the U.S. honeybee population has declined by 60%.

Bees pollinate one-third of the food we eat.

From apples and squash to buckwheat and coffee, bees are responsible for pollinating most of the fruits, vegetables, seeds, and nuts that are essential to our diets. Honeybees in particular play a huge role in agriculture, contributing over $15 billion to the value of US crop production.

Without Bees, We'd Lose:

100%  Almonds

90%  Apples

90% Onions 

90% Blueberries

90% Cucumbers

90% Carrots*

*Source: Honey Bee Colony Collapse Disorder, Renee Johnson, Congressional Research Service 2010.

 Two things you can do right now to help save bees.

1. Plant a Bee Garden

One of the largest threats to bees is a lack of safe habitat where they can build homes and find a variety of nutritious food sources. By planting a bee garden, you can create a habitat corridor with plants that are rich in pollen and nectar. You don’t need a ton of space to grow bee-friendly plants — gardens can be established across yards and in window boxes, flower pots, and planters. You can also get involved with local organizations and governments to find opportunities to enrich public and shared spaces.

2. Go Chemical-Free for Bees

Synthetic pesticides, fertilizers, herbicides, and neonicotinoids are harmful to bees, wreaking havoc on their sensitive systems. Avoid treating your garden and green spaces with synthetics. Instead, use organic products and natural solutions such compost to aid soil health and adding beneficial insects that keep pests away like ladybugs and praying mantises.